Information
In 1874, STILL developed the osteopathic concept and defined the interdependence of the musculo-skeletal axis with the other organic systems.
History
Hippocrates - 460 BC - was the first to think that medicine should focus on readjusting the body’s functions. It is then a question of paying attention to the causes rather than to the symptoms.
 
With his conception of osteopathy, Andrew Taylor STILL (1828 – 1917) made a contribution to this way of thinking looking at the patient holistically.
In 1874, STILL developed the osteopathic concept and defined the interdependence of the musculo-skeletal axis with the other organic systems.
 
The first school of osteopathy: “the American School of Osteopathy.” opened in Kirksville in 1892.
 
In 1918, John Martin LITTLEJOHN (a former pupil of A.T. STILL) created the British School of Osteopathy in London.
 
In 1929, William G. SUTHERLAND (1873-1954) published an original proposition which led to the idea of cranial mobility.
 
In 1945 the President of the United States, Franklin D. ROOSEVELT accorded Osteopaths the same rights as those accorded to Doctors in medicine.
 
Having opened “the Ecole Française de l’Osteopathie” in Paris in 1955, Paul GENY, Thomas DUMMER and Margery BLOOMFIELD created the E.S.O. “European School of Osteopathy” in Maidstone (G.B.) with a course given in French which was to take in students from many countries for nearly 20 years.
 
Later, the dean CORNILLOT and the doctor Didier FELTESSE created a University Department of Osteopathy in the Faculty of Medicine at Bobigny.
 
The E.S.O. decided to discontinue its part-time French-speaking course in 1974.
 
The CSO, its sole French representative took over its duties in Paris and Toulouse from 1983.
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